Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Amador Child Abuse Prevention Council - Nov 2019




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Child Abuse Prevention Council
PO Box 815
Jackson, CA 95642
Location: 975 Broadway, Jackson
209-223-5921  *  info@amadorcapc.org
It's our job as adults to keep kids safe.
CAPC Newsletter                                                  November 2019

What are Protective Factors?

And how do they relate to child abuse prevention?

Did you know that there are certain signs to look for that can help prevent abuse or neglect? Today we're looking at the protective factors, what they mean and how you can identify and strengthen them in your family, place of work, and community.


The Protective Factors Framework
Five Protective Factors are the foundation 
of the Strengthening Families Approach: parental 
resilience, social connections, concrete support in times of need, knowledge of parenting and child development, and social and emotional competence of children. Research studies support the common-sense notion that when these Protective Factors are well established in a family, the likelihood of child abuse and neglect diminishes. Research shows that these protec­tive factors are also "promotive" factors that build family strengths and a family environment that promotes optimal child and youth development.

Parental Resilience
No one can eliminate stress from parenting, but a parent's capacity for resilience can affect how a parent deals with stress. Resilience is the ability to manage and bounce back from all types of challenges that emerge in every family's life. It means finding ways to solve problems, building and sustaining trusting relationships including relationships with your own child, and knowing how to seek help when necessary.

Social Connections
Friends, family members, neighbors and community members provide emotional support, help solve problems, offer parenting advice and give concrete assistance to parents. Networks of support are essential to parents and also offer opportunities for people to "give back," an important part of self- esteem as well as a benefit for the community. Isolated families may need extra help in reaching out to build positive relationships.

Concrete Support in Times of Need
Meeting basic economic needs like food, shelter, clothing and health care is essential for families to thrive. Likewise, when families encounter a crisis such as domestic violence, mental illness or substance abuse, adequate services and supports need to be in place to provide stability, treatment and help for family members to get through the crisis.

Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development
Accurate information about child development and appropriate expectations for children's behavior at every age help parents see their children and youth in a positive light and promote their healthy development. Information can come from many sources, including family members as well as parent education classes and surfing the internet. Studies show information is most effective when it comes at the precise time parents need it to understand their own children. Parents who experienced harsh discipline or other negative childhood experiences may need extra help to change the parenting patterns they learned as children.

Social and Emotional Competence of Children
A child or youth's ability to interact positively with others, self-regulate their behavior and effec­tively communicate their feelings has a positive impact on their relationships with their family, other adults, and peers. Challenging behaviors or delayed development create extra stress for families, so early identification and assistance for both parents and children can head off nega­tive results and keep development on track.





 
Family Strengthening  
Mini-Grants Now Available!
 
We are excited to announce that funding is available for Family Strengthening mini-grant proposals for the 2019-20 fiscal year. Mini-grants will be awarded up to $2,000. Funding is provided by the Amador Child Abuse Prevention Council (ACAPC).
 
Grants are available for qualified organizations and agencies to provide Family Strengthening programs within the County of Amador.
 
Family Strengthening is the premise that children do well when families do well, and that
families do well when they live in supportive communities. Enhancing connections within
families, and between families, and the institutions that affect them, result in better outcomes
for children and their families.
 
Mini-Grant Application

Mini-Grant applications may be submitted to ACAPC at any time throughout the 2018-19 fiscal year, however grant reviews and awards will occur bi-monthly.
I Am Listening
I Will Do My Part

Preventing child abuse is everyone's responsibility. 
 

The initial response to hearing about abuse will have an important impact on the safety and well-being of the child and family.

Here is how you can listen and respond in a way that is in the best interest of the child.

1.  Stay Calm
     Control expressions of shock or disbelief. A child needs to know that you are 
     strong enough to hear what they have to say.


2.  Believe
     Express your belief that the child is telling the truth. A child may have kept the 
     abuse a secret in fear of not being believed.


3.  Reassure
     Acknowledge the child's courage and that they are not to blame for what happened.


4.  No Blame
     Don't speak negatively. The person harming the child may be a family member or 
     someone they know or love.


5.  You are Brave
     Let the child know what you will do next to help keep them safe.


6.  Report
     Report any suspicion of child abuse to local law enforcement or Child  
     Protective Services, or to 1-800-4-A-CHILD.



Thank you to the 
for sharing this resource.

A Trauma-Informed Book Club!

Here is a great way to become trauma-informed and build your knowledge around adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and resiliency.
 
Inspired by an ACEs Connection idea, we are following along, sharing with you one book each month that focuses on the issues of trauma and toxic stress in children and in our communities. Read along with us, and use the discussion questions to further the conversation around this timely and important topic. Join us on our Facebook page to discuss the follow-up questions each month for a more in-depth understanding of how trauma, ACEs, and resiliency are inter-related and impact our community.
 
~~~~~~~~~
 


For November  The Last Best Cure 
by Donna Jackson Nakazawa
 
Donna Jackson Nakazawa suffers from an autoimmune disorder, one day she finds herself in a situation where she needs help. Trying to find as many mind-body strategies and different types of integrative medicine to help get her life back on track, Donna goes through multiple different treatments.
 

Summary questions:

  1. Do you know of anyone that is battling a chronic illness?
  2. Do you think children struggle with accepting their condition more than an adult would?
  3. If you have a negative mindset about the situation that you're in, do you think that makes it harder to move along in the healing process?
  4. What are 3 things you've learned from this book and how can they affect your daily life?
 
Please feel free to join in on a conversation about this book 
and these questions on our Facebook page, HERE.
 

Do you want to learn more about ACEs*, Trauma-Informed-Care, Resiliency and Resilient Amador?

The Resilient Amador coalition can now bring to your group, place of work, organization, or business an informative presentation on all of these topics.  

  • What are ACEs? 
  • How does childhood trauma affect us as adults? 
  • What impact can you make in your community to have resilient children and families?

Give us a call to schedule a presentation:  (209) 257-1092.

Learn more here: Resilient Amador

*ACEs ~ Adverse Childhood Experiences
Upcoming Events
Click HERE for a full list of current events in Amador County.
 
 
Free Mandated Reporter Training  
The second Thursday of every month, from 10:00am - 12:00pm, 
the Child Abuse Prevention Council is holding free mandated reporter trainings. Open to parents, teachers, the community, staff or colleagues needing a refresher course, or new staff with no previous training, give 
us a call, (209) 223-5921. For the flyer with all the information, click HERE.    (Please note, there will be no training in December.)
 
Resilient Amador
Join CAPC in creating a county-wide effort to recognize and address 
the impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences(ACEs) in Amador County. 
 
Next Steering Committee meting:  Tuesday, November 12, 3:00-5:oopm 
Here at our CAPC offices, 975 Broadway, Jackson.   
 
 
Next CAPC Meeting
CAPC meetings are the third Monday of every other month.
Monday, November 18, 10:30am-12:00pm
975 Broadway, Jackson 
 
 
Print the FLYER here.
 

Print the FLYER here.


Print the  FLYER here.


Print the  FLYER here.
                              

Would you like to make a difference in the lives of children?

You can support the Child Abuse Prevention Councils efforts to keep our kids safe!
Print out the form HERE, and send it in with your donation today.
About CAPC
Our Vision
All children know how they are valued; all families receive the support, education and tools necessary to give every child a safe, healthy, and nurturing home; and a community that actively supports the health, safety, and education of its children.
Our Mission 
CAPC is committed to preventing all forms of child abuse in Amador County through community partnerships, free trainings, education, and family-centered events that value children, strengthen families, and engage communities. 
Investing in Our Youngest Children
First 5 Logo
Stay up to date on all the latest news and information for the youngest children in our county! Sign up for First 5 Amador's monthly e-newsletter HERE!

Amador Community Resources

For a wallet sized version for yourself, your organization/agency, or your place of work, give us a call - (209) 223-5921 (click HERE to print).

Child Abuse Prevention Council of Amador, Mail: PO Box 815, Jackson, CA 95642, Location: 975 Broadway, Jackson, CA 95642

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